buckaroo


buckaroo
(vaquero [bakéro] < Spanish vaca 'cow' < Latin vaccam 'cow'and Spanish suffix -ero 'profession or office.' Mason's speculation that a Nigerian form mbakara > bakara 'white man' is the model can easily be dismissed on linguistic grounds. See Cassidy and Hill for further details)
   1) Texas: 1827. A working cowboy; later it came to mean any ranch hand. Watts suggests that the term was popularized in pulp literature because it conjures an image of a man on a bucking horse; indeed, A. A. Hill posits a blend with the term buck(ing) as the source for the first syllable. Watts also notes that the most widely known form, buckaroo, was used in the Northwest. In the Southwest bucka-ree was common. Blevins indicates that the term buckaroo was commonly used in "the desert basins of Northern Nevada, Northern California, Eastern Oregon, and Western Idaho." Hendrickson indicates that this word has become so integrated into the English language that it has been the model for over fifty American slang words. Among those referenced by Hendrickson are stinkaroo (a bad play or movie), the old switcheroo (the act of substituting one thing for another with the intention to deceive, 'bait-and-switch tactics'), antsaroo (refers to someone who is impatient or has 'ants in his pants'), jugaroo (jail), and ziparoo (energy). The original Spanish term is vaquero, a common name for a man who cares for cattle.
   Alternate forms: (some early forms were stressed on the second syllable) baccaro, bacquero, baquero, bucaroo, buccaro, buccaroo, buchario, buckara, buckaree, buckayro, buckeroo, buckhara, bukkarer, jackeroo.
   2) Nevada: 1967. It may also be a verb meaning to work as a cowboy.
   See buckaroo1, vaquero.

Cowboy Talk. A Dictionary of Spanish Terms. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Buckaroo — may refer to:* Buckaroo, a cowboy of the vaquero tradition * Bronze Buckaroo , a nickname given to musician Herbert Jeffreys * Buckaroos, the backing band for Buck Owens ** Buckaroo, a song by country singer Buck Owens and the Buckaroos *… …   Wikipedia

  • buckaroo — uckaroo n. 1. [fr. Sp. vaquero.]a cowboy, especially used of one who breaks broncos; used especially in California. Syn: vaquero. [WordNet 1.5] 2. a fellow; a guy. [slang] [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • buckaroo — 1889, Amer.Eng., from bakhara (1827), from Sp. vaquero cowboy, from vaca cow, from L. vacca. Spelling altered by influence of buck …   Etymology dictionary

  • buckaroo — ☆ buckaroo [buk′ə ro͞o΄, buk΄ə ro͞o′ ] n. pl. buckaroos [prob. < Sp vaquero, cowboy (< vaca, cow < L vacca); infl. by BUCK1, n. 4] a cowboy …   English World dictionary

  • buckaroo — noun a) A cowboy, specifically, a working cowboy who generally does not do rodeos. Many cowboy poets have a buckaroo look and feel about them. b) One who sports a distinctive buckaroo style of cowboy clothing, boots, and heritage. Don’t run in… …   Wiktionary

  • buckaroo — noun local names for a cowboy ( vaquero is used especially in southwestern and central Texas and buckaroo is used especially in California) • Syn: ↑vaquero, ↑buckeroo • Hypernyms: ↑cowboy, ↑cowpuncher, ↑puncher, ↑cowman, ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • buckaroo — also buckeroo noun (plural aroos; also eroos) Etymology: probably by folk etymology from Spanish vaquero, from vaca cow, from Latin vacca more at vaccine Date: 1827 1. cowboy 2. broncobus …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • buckaroo — /buk euh rooh , buk euh rooh /, n., pl. buckaroos. 1. Western U.S. a cowboy, esp. a broncobuster. 2. Older Slang. fellow; guy. [1820 30, Amer.; earlier bakhara, baccaro, bucharo < Sp vaquero, equiv. to vac(a) cow ( < L vacca) + ero < L arius ARY; …   Universalium

  • buckaroo — Synonyms and related words: breaker, breeder, broncobuster, caballero, cattleman, cavalier, cavalryman, chevalier, circus rider, cow keeper, cowboy, cowgirl, cowman, cowpuncher, dairy farmer, dairyman, equerry, equestrian, equestrienne, farrier,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • buckaroo — buck|a|roo [ˌbʌkəˈru:] n AmE informal [Date: 1800 1900; : Spanish; Origin: vaquero cowboy ; influenced by BUCK1] a ↑cowboy used especially when talking to children …   Dictionary of contemporary English